Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution:
Titration of a strong acid with a strong base. The pH curve for titration of 50.0 mL of a 0.100 M solution of hydrochloric acid with a 0.100 M solution of NaOH(aq). For clarity, water molecules have been omitted from the molecular art.The graph shows pH changes throughout titration. Only HCl is present before the titration (pH equals 1). H plus is consumed as OH minus is added, forming H2O (pH less than 7.0). A line beginning at pH 1 at 0 milliliters of NaOH increases linearly up to pH 2 at 45 milliliters of NaOH. H plus is completely neutralized by OH minus (pH equals 7.0). The equivalence point (pH 7, NaCl salt solution) occurs when moles of the base are equal to moles of the acid. The pH jumps suddenly at 50 milliliters of NaOH. No H plus is left to react with the excess of OH minus (pH greater than 7). After the drastic increase of pH near the equivalence point, the pH line increases linearly and slowly at the pH of around 12.
What volume of NaOH(aq) would be needed to reach the equivalence point if the concentration of the added base were 0.280 M?

Solution: Titration of a strong acid with a strong base. The pH curve for titration of 50.0 mL of a 0.100 M solution of hydrochloric acid with a 0.100 M solution of NaOH(aq). For clarity, water molecules have b

Problem

Titration of a strong acid with a strong base. The pH curve for titration of 50.0 mL of a 0.100 M solution of hydrochloric acid with a 0.100 M solution of NaOH(aq). For clarity, water molecules have been omitted from the molecular art.

The graph shows pH changes throughout titration. Only HCl is present before the titration (pH equals 1). H plus is consumed as OH minus is added, forming H2O (pH less than 7.0). A line beginning at pH 1 at 0 milliliters of NaOH increases linearly up to pH 2 at 45 milliliters of NaOH. H plus is completely neutralized by OH minus (pH equals 7.0). The equivalence point (pH 7, NaCl salt solution) occurs when moles of the base are equal to moles of the acid. The pH jumps suddenly at 50 milliliters of NaOH. No H plus is left to react with the excess of OH minus (pH greater than 7). After the drastic increase of pH near the equivalence point, the pH line increases linearly and slowly at the pH of around 12.

What volume of NaOH(aq) would be needed to reach the equivalence point if the concentration of the added base were 0.280 M?

Solution

We’re being asked to calculate the volume (in mL) of 0.280 M NaOH (strong base) required to reach the equivalence point in a titration of 50.00 mL of 0.100 M HCl (strong acid)


Recall that at the equivalence point of a titration:


moles acid=moles base


Also, recall that moles = molarity × volume

This means:


MVacid=MVbase


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