Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: A solution containing several metal ions is treated with dilute HCl; no precipitate forms. The pH is adjusted to about 1, and H2S is bubbled through. Again, no precipitate forms. The pH of the solutio

Problem

A solution containing several metal ions is treated with dilute HCl; no precipitate forms. The pH is adjusted to about 1, and H2S is bubbled through. Again, no precipitate forms. The pH of the solution is then adjusted to about 8. Again, H2S is bubbled through. This time a precipitate forms. The filtrate from this solution is treated with (NH4)2HPO4. No precipitate forms.

Which of these metal cations are either possibly present or definitely absent: Al3+, Na+, Ag+, Mg2+?

Solution

We have to determine if any of the ions, Al3+, Na+, Ag+ or Mg2+, is either present or absent in the solution.

In qualitative analysis, we can separate metal ions through precipitation reactions.

Metal ions are classified into 5 groups based on their solubility and type of anion they form a precipitate with.

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