Ch.14 - Chemical EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Acetic acid can be manufactured by combining methanol with carbon monoxide, an example of a  carbonylation reaction: CH3 OH( l ) + CO( g )  →  3 COOH( l )Industrially, this reaction is run at temperatures above 25 oC. Will an increase in temperature produce an increase or decrease in the mole fraction of acetic acid at equilibrium?

Solution: Acetic acid can be manufactured by combining methanol with carbon monoxide, an example of a  carbonylation reaction:CH3 OH( l ) + CO( g )  →  3 COOH( l )Industrially, this reaction is run at temperatu

Problem

Acetic acid can be manufactured by combining methanol with carbon monoxide, an example of a  carbonylation reaction:
CH3 OH( l ) + CO( g )  →  3 COOH( l )

Industrially, this reaction is run at temperatures above 25 oC. Will an increase in temperature produce an increase or decrease in the mole fraction of acetic acid at equilibrium?

Solution

We’re asked to determine if an increase in temperature will produce an increase or decrease in the mole fraction of acetic acid at equilibrium.


We’re given the carbonylation reaction to form acetic acid at temperatures above 25°C:


CH3OH (l) + CO (g)   CH3COOH (l)


Recall that the mole fraction is the ratio of the moles of acetic acid (solute) and the total moles of the solution.


To determine how the temperature affects the mole fraction of acetic acid for the given reaction, we need to do these steps:

Step 1. Determine whether the reaction is exothermic or endothermic by solving for ΔH°rxn at 25°C using standard values for H°f

Recall that:

  • When  ΔH > 0 (positive) → endothermic
  • When  ΔH < 0 (negative) → exothermic
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