Ch.14 - Chemical EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The equilibrium between NO2 and N2O4.If you were to let the tube on the right sit overnight and then take another picture would the brown color look darker, lighter, or the same?

Problem

A frozen N2O4 sample is nearly colorless. A photograph shows a clear rod in a beaker. A molecular view of the frozen sample shows densely packed rows of N2O4 molecules. On warming, the N2O4 becomes a gas and partially dissociates to form brown NO2 (gas). A photograph shows that the sample in the beaker now appears light brown, and a molecular view shows widely spaced NO2 and N2O4 molecules. Colors stop changing when equilibrium is reached: rate of forward reaction N2O4 (gas) goes to 2 NO2 (gas) equals the rate of the reverse reaction 2 NO2 (gas) goes to N2O4 (gas). A photograph shows a dark brown sample in a beaker, and a molecular view shows NO2 and N2O4 molecules that are fairly close together but with space still between them.
The equilibrium between NO2 and N2O4.

If you were to let the tube on the right sit overnight and then take another picture would the brown color look darker, lighter, or the same?