Ch.14 - Chemical EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Equilibrium Expressions

See all sections
Sections
Chemical Equilibrium
ICE Chart
Le Chatelier's Principle
The Reaction Quotient
Additional Practice
Equilibrium Expressions

Solution: Ethene (C2H4) can be halogenated by the following reaction: C2H4(g) + X2(g) ⇌ C2H4X2(g)where X2 can be Cl2 (green), Br2 (brown), or I2 (purple). Examine the three figures below representing equilibriu

Problem
Ethene (C2H4) can be halogenated by the following reaction: C2H4(g) + X2(g) ⇌ C2H4X2(g)
where X2 can be Cl2 (green), Br2 (brown), or I2 (purple). Examine the three figures below representing equilibrium concentrations in this reaction at the same temperature for the three different halogens.
There are three figures. The first figure (a) has two Cl2 molecules, two C2H4 molecules, and eight C2H4Cl2 molecules. The second figure (b) has four Br2 molecules, four C2H4 molecules, and six C2H4Br2 molecules. The third figure (c) has seven I2 molecules, seven C2H4 molecules, and three C2H4I2 molecules.

Rank the equilibrium constants for these three reactions from largest to smallest.