Problem: Nitrogen oxide is a pollutant in the lower atmosphere that irritates the eyes and lungs and leads to the formation of acid rain. Nitrogen oxide forms naturally in atmosphere according to the endothermic reaction: N2(g) + O2(g) ⇌ 2NO(g); Kp = 4.1 x 10–31 at 298 KUse the ideal gas law to calculate the concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen present in air at a pressure of 1.0 atm and a temperature of 298 K. Assume that nitrogen comprises 78% of air by volume and that oxygen comprises 21%.

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Brewer's class at UARK.

FREE Expert Solution

We are asked to calculate the concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen present in air at a pressure of 1.0 atm and a temperature of 298 K assuming that nitrogen comprises 78% of air by volume and that oxygen comprises 21%.

To do so, we shall follow these steps:

Step 1: Determine the partial pressures and initial concentrations of the gases. 

Step 2: Convert Kp to Kc. 

Step 3: Construct an ICE chart and determine the equilibrium concentrations of the gases.


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Problem Details
Nitrogen oxide is a pollutant in the lower atmosphere that irritates the eyes and lungs and leads to the formation of acid rain. Nitrogen oxide forms naturally in atmosphere according to the endothermic reaction: N2(g) + O2(g) ⇌ 2NO(g); Kp = 4.1 x 10–31 at 298 K
Use the ideal gas law to calculate the concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen present in air at a pressure of 1.0 atm and a temperature of 298 K. Assume that nitrogen comprises 78% of air by volume and that oxygen comprises 21%.

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the The Ideal Gas Law concept. You can view video lessons to learn The Ideal Gas Law. Or if you need more The Ideal Gas Law practice, you can also practice The Ideal Gas Law practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Brewer's class at UARK.