Ch.18 - ElectrochemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Consider the following half-reactions:IrCl63- + 3e- → Ir + 6Cl -         ε° = 0.77 VPtCl42- + 2e- → Pt + 4Cl -       ε° = 0.73 VPdCl42- + 2e- →Pd + 4Cl -      ε° = 0.62 VA hydrochloric acid solution c

Problem

Consider the following half-reactions:

IrCl63- + 3e→ Ir + 6Cl -         ε° = 0.77 V

PtCl42- + 2e- → Pt + 4Cl -       ε° = 0.73 V

PdCl42- + 2e→Pd + 4Cl -      ε° = 0.62 V

A hydrochloric acid solution contains platinum, palladium, and iridium as chloro-complex ions. The solution is a constant 1.0 M in chloride ion and 0.020 M in each complex ion. Is it feasible to separate the three metals from this solution by electrolysis? (Assume that 99% of a metal must be plated out before another metal begins to plate out.)