Ch.18 - ElectrochemistryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The ultimate electron acceptor in the respiration process is molecular oxygen. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain takes place through a complex series of oxidation–reduction reactions. Some of the electron transport steps use iron-containing proteins called cytochromes. All cytochromes transport electrons by converting the iron in the cytochromes from the 13 to the 12 oxidation state. Consider the following reduction potentials for three different cytochromes used in the transfer process of electrons to oxygen (the potentials have been corrected for pH and for temperature): cytochrome a(Fe3+) + e→ cytochrome a(Fe2+)      E = 0.385 V
cytochrome b(Fe3+) + e→ cytochrome b(Fe2+)      E = 0.030 V
cytochrome c(Fe3+) + e- → cytochrome c(Fe2+)       E = 0.254 V
In the electron transfer series, electrons are transferred from one cytochrome to another. Using this information, determine the cytochrome order necessary for spontaneous transport of electrons from one cytochrome to another, which eventually will lead to electron transfer to O2.

Solution: The ultimate electron acceptor in the respiration process is molecular oxygen. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain takes place through a complex series of oxidation–reduction reactions. So

Problem

The ultimate electron acceptor in the respiration process is molecular oxygen. Electron transfer through the respiratory chain takes place through a complex series of oxidation–reduction reactions. Some of the electron transport steps use iron-containing proteins called cytochromes. All cytochromes transport electrons by converting the iron in the cytochromes from the 13 to the 12 oxidation state. Consider the following reduction potentials for three different cytochromes used in the transfer process of electrons to oxygen (the potentials have been corrected for pH and for temperature): 

cytochrome a(Fe3+) + e→ cytochrome a(Fe2+)      E = 0.385 V
cytochrome b(Fe3+) + e→ cytochrome b(Fe2+)      E = 0.030 V
cytochrome c(Fe3+) + e- → cytochrome c(Fe2+)       E = 0.254 V

In the electron transfer series, electrons are transferred from one cytochrome to another. Using this information, determine the cytochrome order necessary for spontaneous transport of electrons from one cytochrome to another, which eventually will lead to electron transfer to O2.