Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Soaps consist of compounds such as sodium stearate, CH3(CH2)16COO–Na+, that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts. Consider the hydrocarbon part of sodium stearate to be the "tail" and the charg

Problem

Soaps consist of compounds such as sodium stearate, CH3(CH2)16COONa+, that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts. Consider the hydrocarbon part of sodium stearate to be the "tail" and the charged part to be the "head."

If you have large deposits of grease that you want to wash away with water, you can see that adding sodium stearate will help you produce an emulsion. What intermolecular interactions are responsible for this?