Problem: Soaps consist of compounds such as sodium stearate, CH3(CH2)16COO–Na+, that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts. Consider the hydrocarbon part of sodium stearate to be the "tail" and the charged part to be the "head."If you have large deposits of grease that you want to wash away with water, you can see that adding sodium stearate will help you produce an emulsion. What intermolecular interactions are responsible for this?

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Wade's class at OSU.

FREE Expert Solution

We are asked what intermolecular forces of attraction are present in soap molecules.

The soap molecule has two different ends, one that is hydrophilic (polar head) that binds with water and the other that is hydrophobic (non-polar hydrocarbon tail) that binds with grease and oil.

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Problem Details

Soaps consist of compounds such as sodium stearate, CH3(CH2)16COONa+, that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts. Consider the hydrocarbon part of sodium stearate to be the "tail" and the charged part to be the "head."

If you have large deposits of grease that you want to wash away with water, you can see that adding sodium stearate will help you produce an emulsion. What intermolecular interactions are responsible for this?

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Solutions, Molarity and Intermolecular Forces concept. You can view video lessons to learn Solutions, Molarity and Intermolecular Forces. Or if you need more Solutions, Molarity and Intermolecular Forces practice, you can also practice Solutions, Molarity and Intermolecular Forces practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Wade's class at OSU.