Problem: Proteins frequently form complexes in which 2, 3, 4 or even more individual proteins (“monomers”) interact specifically with each other via hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions. The entire assembly of proteins can act as one unit in solution, and this assembly is called the “quaternary structure” of the protein. Suppose you discover a new protein whose monomer molar mass is 25,000 g/mol. You measure an osmotic pressure of 0.0916 atm at 37 oC for 7.20 g of the protein in 10.00 mL of an aqueous solution. How many protein monomers form the quaternary protein structure in solution? Treat the protein as a nonelectrolyte.

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Proteins frequently form complexes in which 2, 3, 4 or even more individual proteins (“monomers”) interact specifically with each other via hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions. The entire assembly of proteins can act as one unit in solution, and this assembly is called the “quaternary structure” of the protein. Suppose you discover a new protein whose monomer molar mass is 25,000 g/mol. You measure an osmotic pressure of 0.0916 atm at 37 oC for 7.20 g of the protein in 10.00 mL of an aqueous solution. How many protein monomers form the quaternary protein structure in solution? Treat the protein as a nonelectrolyte.

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