Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Osmosis through red blood cell walls. If water moves out of the red blood cell, it shrivels (crenation); if water moves into the red blood cell, it will swell and may burst (hemolysis).If the fluid surrounding a patient’s red blood cells is depleted in electrolytes, is crenation or hemolysis more likely to occur?

Problem

A red blood cell in isotonic medium neither swells nor shrinks. Water molecules move in and out of the cell but there is no net movement of water and the cell maintains its typical disk shape with an indented center. Crenation of red blood cell placed in hypertonic environment. A red blood cell (low relative internal solute concentration) is placed in a high-solute concentration environment. There is a net movement of water out of the cell and the cell shrivels. Hemolysis of red blood cell placed in hypotonic environment. A red blood cell with high relative internal solute concentration is placed in a low solute concentration environment. There is a net movement of water into the cell and it swells.


Osmosis through red blood cell walls. If water moves out of the red blood cell, it shrivels (crenation); if water moves into the red blood cell, it will swell and may burst (hemolysis).

If the fluid surrounding a patient’s red blood cells is depleted in electrolytes, is crenation or hemolysis more likely to occur?