Ch.12 - SolutionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: You take a sample of water that is at room temperature and in contact with air and put it under a vacuum. Right away, you see bubbles leave the water, but after a little while, the bubbles stop. As you keep applying the vacuum, more bubbles appear. A friend tells you that the first bubbles were water vapor, and the low pressure had reduced the boiling point of water, causing the water to boil. Another friend tells you that the first bubbles were gas molecules from the air (oxygen, nitrogen, and so forth) that were dissolved in the water.Which friend is mostly likely to be correct?

Solution: You take a sample of water that is at room temperature and in contact with air and put it under a vacuum. Right away, you see bubbles leave the water, but after a little while, the bubbles stop. As yo

Problem

You take a sample of water that is at room temperature and in contact with air and put it under a vacuum. Right away, you see bubbles leave the water, but after a little while, the bubbles stop. As you keep applying the vacuum, more bubbles appear. A friend tells you that the first bubbles were water vapor, and the low pressure had reduced the boiling point of water, causing the water to boil. Another friend tells you that the first bubbles were gas molecules from the air (oxygen, nitrogen, and so forth) that were dissolved in the water.

Which friend is mostly likely to be correct?