Problem: A solution contains equal amounts (in moles) of liquid components A and B. The vapor pressure of pure A is 100 mmHg and that of pure B is 200 mmHg. The experimentally measured vapor pressure of the solution is 120 mmHg. What are the relative strengths of the solute–solute, solute–solvent, and solvent–solvent interactions in this solution?a) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are weaker than those between particles of A and those between particles of B.b) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are stronger than those between particles of A and those between particles of B.c) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are the same as those between particles of A and those between particles of B.d) Nothing can be concluded about the relative strength of intermolecular forces from this observation.

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We are asked to determine the relative strengths of the solute–solute, solute-solvent, and solvent–solvent interactions in this solution.


In the absence of Intermolecular Forces of attraction (ideal solution) two substances spontaneously mix to form a homogenous solution. 

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A solution contains equal amounts (in moles) of liquid components A and B. The vapor pressure of pure A is 100 mmHg and that of pure B is 200 mmHg. The experimentally measured vapor pressure of the solution is 120 mmHg. What are the relative strengths of the solute–solute, solute–solvent, and solvent–solvent interactions in this solution?

a) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are weaker than those between particles of A and those between particles of B.

b) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are stronger than those between particles of A and those between particles of B.

c) The intermolecular forces between particles A and B are the same as those between particles of A and those between particles of B.

d) Nothing can be concluded about the relative strength of intermolecular forces from this observation.

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