Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The effect of temperature on the distribution of kinetic energies in a liquid. As the temperature increases, does the rate of molecules escaping into the gas phase increase or decrease?

Problem
The effect of temperature on the distribution of kinetic energies in a liquid.

A graph has kinetic energy on the x-axis and fraction of molecules on the y-axis. Midway along the x-axis is a vertical dotted line representing the minimum kinetic energy needed to escape. 2 curves are plotted: 1 for lower temperature and 1 for higher temperature. The lower temperature peak is higher, narrower, and to the left of the higher temperature peak. The right tail of the higher temperature curve crosses the minimum kinetic energy to escape line at a higher point than the right peak of the lower temperature curve, showing that there is a higher fraction of molecules with the kinetic energy to escape at higher temperatures as compared to lower temperatures. These areas are shown in red and blue on the graph; red + blue areas equals fraction of molecules having enough energy to evaporate at higher temperature while blue area = fraction of molecules having enough energy to evaporate at lower temperature. The blue area appears less than half the size of the red plus blue area.

As the temperature increases, does the rate of molecules escaping into the gas phase increase or decrease?