Chemistry Practice Problems Chemical Bonds Practice Problems Solution: Atoms in metals easily slip past one another as me...

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Solution: Atoms in metals easily slip past one another as mechanical force is applied; can you think of why this would not be true for ionic solids?

Problem

Atoms in metals easily slip past one another as mechanical force is applied; can you think of why this would not be true for ionic solids?


A diagram shows a rectangular 4 by 6 grid of spheres. When opposite forces are applied at the upper left and lower right sides, the spheres shift so that the top two rows overhang the bottom two.


Solution

We are asked why the situation below would not be true for ionic solids?


A diagram shows a rectangular 4 by 6 grid of spheres. When opposite forces are applied at the upper left and lower right sides, the spheres shift so that the top two rows overhang the bottom two.


An ionic bond forms when a cation and anion combine because of their opposite charges.

  • The central idea of ionic bonding is that the metal transfers an electron(s) to a nonmetal.
  • The metal then becomes a cation (positive ion) and the nonmetal becomes an anion (negative ion). 
  • Their opposite charges cause them to combine into a crystalline solid.


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