Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Flowchart for determining intermolecular forces. Multiple types of intermolecular forces can be at work in a given substance or mixture. In particular, dispersion forces occur in all subs

Problem

Energy for dispersion forces ranges from 0.1 to 30 kJ/mol, and are found in atoms, nonpolar molecules, polar molecules with and without OH, NH, or HF groups, and in ionic solids dissolved in polar liquids. Energy for dipole-dipole interactions ranges from 2 to 15 kJ/mol, and are found in polar molecules both with and without OH, NH, or HF groups. Energy for hydrogen bonding ranges from 10 to 40 kJ/mol, and is found in polar molecules containing OH, NH, or HF groups. Energy for ion-dipole interactions is greater than 50 kJ/mol, and are found in ionic solids dissolved in polar liquids.


Flowchart for determining intermolecular forces. Multiple types of intermolecular forces can be at work in a given substance or mixture. In particular, dispersion forces occur in all substances.

Can the energies of multiple dispersion forces between two molecules be larger than the energy of hydrogen bonding between the two molecules?