Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Which of these statements about alloys and intermetallic compounds is false?(a) Bronze is an example of an alloy.(b) “Alloy” is just another word for “a chemical compound of fixed composition that is

Problem

Which of these statements about alloys and intermetallic compounds is false?
(a) Bronze is an example of an alloy.
(b) “Alloy” is just another word for “a chemical compound of fixed composition that is made of two or more metals.”
(c) Intermetallics are compounds of two or more metals that have a definite composition and are not considered alloys.
(d) If you mix two metals together and, at the atomic level, they separate into two or more different compositional phases, you have created a heterogeneous alloy.
(e) Alloys can be formed even if the atoms that comprise them are rather different in size.