Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Generic phase diagram for a pure substance. The green line is the sublimation curve, the blue line is the melting curve, and the red line is the vapor-pressure curve.Imagine that the pressure on the s

Solution: Generic phase diagram for a pure substance. The green line is the sublimation curve, the blue line is the melting curve, and the red line is the vapor-pressure curve.Imagine that the pressure on the s

Problem


Solid phase is at the left of the diagram (low temperature and ranging from low to high pressure). Below the triple point, T, which separates solids, liquids and gases, at low temperature and pressure, sublimation moves solids to gas and deposition moves gas to solid. Above the triple point, at higher pressure and medium temperature, melting moves solids to liquids and freezing moves liquids to solids. The vapor pressure curve increases from the triple point T to the critical point, C, at higher temperature and pressure. Above the critical point, liquid and gas converge to become a super critical fluid. Liquids vaporize across the vapor pressure curve to gas and gases condense across the vapor pressure curve to liquid.


Generic phase diagram for a pure substance. The green line is the sublimation curve, the blue line is the melting curve, and the red line is the vapor-pressure curve.


Imagine that the pressure on the solid phase in the figure is decreased at constant temperature. If the solid eventually sublimes, what must be true about the temperature?

Solution

We are asked what would be true about temperature if the pressure is decreased and the solid eventually sublimes.

Sublimation is the transition of a substance directly from the solid to the gas phase, without passing through the intermediate liquid phase. 

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