Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The rutile and fluorite structures, shown here (anions are colored green and are the larger of the two spheres), are two of the most common structure types for ionic compounds where the cation-to-anio

Problem

The rutile and fluorite structures, shown here (anions are colored green and are the larger of the two spheres), are two of the most common structure types for ionic compounds where the cation-to-anion ratio is 1:2.

Rutile is a rectangular cuboid with cations at its corners and two rows of three anions inside. Fluorine is a cube with cations at its corners and face centers and anions inside.

For CaF2 and ZnF2 use ionic radii, Ca2+ (r=1.14), Zn2+ (r=0.88), and F- (r=1.19), to predict which compound is more likely to crystallize with the fluorite structure and which with the rutile structure.