Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Refer to the figure, and describe all the phase changes that would occur in each of the following cases:Water originally at 100.0˚C and 0.50 atm is cooled at constant pressure until the temperature is

Problem

Refer to the figure, and describe all the phase changes that would occur in each of the following cases:
Water originally at 100.0˚C and 0.50 atm is cooled at constant pressure until the temperature is –10˚C.

The x-axis is temperature in degrees C, ranging from -200 to +600 in intervals of 200. The y-axis is pressure in atmospheres, ranging from 10-4 to 103 in log scale.   The triple point occurs at 0.0098 degrees Celsius and 0.00603 atmospheres.  The critical pt occurs at 374.4 celsius and 217.7 atms.  The sublimation curve extends from -25 degrees celsius and 10^-4 atmospheres to the triple point.  The melting point is a nearly vertical curve from the triple point to the top of the y-axis.  The Vapor-pressure curve connects the triple point to the critical point.  Everything to the left of the melting curve and the sublimation curve is in the solid phase; the liquid phase is on the right between the triple point and critical point and over the melting and vapor pressure curves.  The gas phase is below the sublimation and vapor pressure curves.  The top right corner of the graph to the right of the critical pt and above gas is the supercritical fluid phase.