Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Vapor pressure for four liquids as a function of temperature.What is the vapor pressure of ethylene glycol at its normal boiling point?

Problem

The x-axis is temperature (degrees C), ranging from 0 to 100 with intervals of 20. The y-axis is vapor pressure (torr), ranging from 0 to 800 with intervals of 200. There is a horizontal dotted line at 760 torr, which intersects the curve for three of the substances plotted at their normal boiling points. Ethylene glycol never intersects the dotted line. Diethyl ether is 0 degrees celsius at 200 torr, 18 degrees at 400 torr, 25 at 600, 34.6 (normal boiling point) at 760, and 36 at 800. Ethyl alcohol, or ethanol, is near 0 degrees celsius at 0 torr, 48 degrees at 200 torr, 65 degrees at 400 torr, 75 at 600, 78.3 (normal boiling point) at 760, and 80 at 800. Water is 0 degrees celsius at 0 torr, 65 degrees at 200 torr, 82 degrees at 400 torr, 92 at 600, 100 (normal boiling point) at 760, and 105 at 800. Ethylene glycol is 60 degrees celsius at 0 torr.  Its highest pressure is about 90 at a temperature of 110.
Vapor pressure for four liquids as a function of temperature.

What is the vapor pressure of ethylene glycol at its normal boiling point?