Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular ForcesWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: The high-pressure phase diagram of ice is shown at the top of the next column. Notice that, under high pressure, ice can exist in several different solid forms .Would ice III sink or float in liquid w

Problem

The high-pressure phase diagram of ice is shown at the top of the next column. Notice that, under high pressure, ice can exist in several different solid forms A diagram of temperature versus pressure. An upward curving line extends from the origin to about .5 atm. From there another upward curving line extends upward, and a straight line extends upward with a negative slope. The region below the two curving lines is labled gaseous water. The region to the right of the vertical line is labled liquid water, and to the left is labled ice one. At the top of the upward line is a trapezoidal shaped region, labled ice three within. To the left of this is a region labled ice two. Above the trapezoid is a region labled ice five. Point O lies at the vertex of the trapezoid and a line extending outward from its upper left hand corner..

Would ice III sink or float in liquid water?