Problem: Argon has a normal boiling point of 87.2 K and a melting point (at 1 atm) of 84.1 K. Its critical temperature is 150.8 K and critical pressure is 48.3 atm. It has a triple point at 83.7 K and 0.68 atm.Sketch the phase diagram to answer whether solid argon or liquid argon has the greater density?

FREE Expert Solution
84% (376 ratings)
FREE Expert Solution

In a phase diagram, the different phases can be identified by their location:

• Solid: can be found at high pressure and low temperature

• Liquid: can be found between the solid and gas regions 

• Gas: can be found at low pressure and high temperature

• Triple Point: the point at which all three phases are in equilibrium

• Critical Point: the point at which the liquid and gas phases coexist. The resulting phase is a supercritical fluid.

 Normal boiling point: is the temperature at which a liquid changes into a gas at 1 atm. In the phase diagram, boiling occurs on the line separating the liquid from the gas phase:


Construct the phase diagram of Argon:

84% (376 ratings)
View Complete Written Solution
Problem Details

Argon has a normal boiling point of 87.2 K and a melting point (at 1 atm) of 84.1 K. Its critical temperature is 150.8 K and critical pressure is 48.3 atm. It has a triple point at 83.7 K and 0.68 atm.

Sketch the phase diagram to answer whether solid argon or liquid argon has the greater density?

Frequently Asked Questions

What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Phase Diagram concept. You can view video lessons to learn Phase Diagram. Or if you need more Phase Diagram practice, you can also practice Phase Diagram practice problems.

What is the difficulty of this problem?

Our tutors rated the difficulty ofArgon has a normal boiling point of 87.2 K and a melting poi...as high difficulty.

How long does this problem take to solve?

Our expert Chemistry tutor, Dasha took 6 minutes and 44 seconds to solve this problem. You can follow their steps in the video explanation above.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Fountain's class at SCAR.