Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: An ecobotanist separates the components of a tropical bark extract by chromatography. She discovers a large proportion of quinidine, a dextrorotatory isomer of quinine used for control of arrhythmic h

Problem

An ecobotanist separates the components of a tropical bark extract by chromatography. She discovers a large proportion of quinidine, a dextrorotatory isomer of quinine used for control of arrhythmic heartbeat. Quinidine has two basic nitrogens (Kb1 = 4.0 × 10−6 and Kb2 = 1.0 × 10−10). To measure the concentration of quinidine, she carries out a titration. Because of the low solubility of quinidine, she first protonates both nitrogens with excess HCl and titrates the acidified solution with standardized base. A 33.85-mg sample of quinidine (ℳ = 324.41 g/mol) is acidified with 6.55 mL of 0.150 M HCl.

(a) How many milliliters of 0.0133 M NaOH are needed to titrate the excess HCl?