Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Quantitative analysis of Cl− ion is often performed by a titration with silver nitrate, using sodium chromate as an indicator. As standardized AgNO3 is added, both white AgCl and red Ag2CrO4 precipita

Problem

Quantitative analysis of Cl ion is often performed by a titration with silver nitrate, using sodium chromate as an indicator. As standardized AgNO3 is added, both white AgCl and red Ag2CrO4 precipitate, but as long as some Cl remains, the Ag2CrO4 redissolves as the mixture is stirred. When the red color is permanent, the equivalence point has been reached. 

(c) If 25.00 cm3 of 0.1000 M NaCl is mixed with 25.00 cm3 of 0.1000 M AgNO3, what is the concentration of Ag+ remaining in solution? Is this sufficient to precipitate any silver chromate?