Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond TheoryWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: State whether each of these statements is true or false:(a) A carbon–carbon triple bond is shorter than a carbon–carbon single bond.(b) There are exactly six bonding electrons in the O2 molecule.(c) T

Problem

State whether each of these statements is true or false:
(a) A carbon–carbon triple bond is shorter than a carbon–carbon single bond.
(b) There are exactly six bonding electrons in the O2 molecule.
(c) The C—O bond in carbon monoxide is longer than the C—O bond in carbon dioxide.
(d) The O—O bond in ozone is shorter than the O—O bond in O2.
(e) The more electronegative the atom, the more bonds it makes to other atoms.