Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Figure: Representative oxidation states of the elements. Note that hydrogen has both positive and negative oxidation numbers, +1 and -1. The red stepped line divides metals from nonmetal

Problem

Oxidation states are as follows.  Group 1A (metals) all have +1 oxidation state. Group 2A (metals) are all 2+. Transition metals include: Sc3+, Y3+, Lu3+, Ti4+, Zr4+, Hf4+, V4+, V5+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Mn4+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Co3+, Ni2+, Pd2+, Pt2+, Cu+, Cu2+, Ag+, Au+, Au3+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+.  3A (metal) includes Al3+.  4A (metals) include Sn2+, Sn4+, Pb3- and Pb4+.  5A (nonmetals) include N3- and P3-.  5A (metals) include: Sb3+, Sb5+, Bi3+, Bi5+.  6A (nonmetals) are all 2-. 7A (nonmetals) are all 1-. Group 8A are the noble gases, which all have full octets. The red line starts under the first element in 3A, boron, then descends right in a step-wise fashion, under 4A element silicon, then 5A element arsenic, then 6A element tellurium, and finally 7A element astatine.

Figure: Representative oxidation states of the elements. Note that hydrogen has both positive and negative oxidation numbers, +1 and -1. The red stepped line divides metals from nonmetals.


The red stepped line divides metals from nonmetals. How are common oxidation states divided by this line?