Ch.7 - Quantum MechanicsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Stars do not all have the same temperature. The color of light emitted by stars is characteristic of the light emitted by hot objects. Telescopic photos of three stars are shown below: (i)

Problem

Stars do not all have the same temperature. The color of light emitted by stars is characteristic of the light emitted by hot objects. Telescopic photos of three stars are shown below:

Photographs of stars show (i) the Sun, appearing bright and orange-yellow, (ii) Rigel, appearing small and blue-white, and (iii) Betelgeuse, appearing medium-sized and orange-yellow.

(i) the Sun, which is classified as a yellow star, (ii) Rigel, in the constellation Orion, which is classified as a blue-white star, and (iii) Betelgeuse, also in Orion, which is classified as a red star.

Place these three stars in order of increasing temperature.