Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond TheoryWorksheetSee all chapters
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Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Does it matter which of the two sp3 hybrid orbitals are used to hold the two nonbonding electron pairs?

Solution: Does it matter which of the two sp3 hybrid orbitals are used to hold the two nonbonding electron pairs?

Problem

Does it matter which of the two sp3 hybrid orbitals are used to hold the two nonbonding electron pairs?

In H2O, there is a tetrahedral arrangement of the four sp3 hybrid orbitals about oxygen, with two O sp3 orbitals containing nonbonding pairs and two O-H single bonds.


Solution

We are asked about the placement of the nonbonding electron pairs in the sp3 hybrid orbitals of oxygen in H2O


Hybridization is when the s and p orbitals combine to form a hybrid orbital for covalent bonding.


In the process of combining the orbitals, the lower energy orbitals are promoted to higher energy while the higher energy orbitals are demoted to lower energy.

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