Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the ElementsWorksheetSee all chapters
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Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
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Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Figure shows the radial probability distribution functions for the 2s orbitals and 2p orbitals. How would you modify Slater’s rules to adjust for the difference in electronic penetration of

Problem

Figure shows the radial probability distribution functions for the 2s orbitals and 2p orbitals.

A line graph has distance from the nucleus in angstroms on the X-axis, ranging from 0 to 10 with intervals of 1, and probability on the Y-axis (unscaled, increasing).  Curves are shown for 1s, 2s, and 2p orbitals. The 1s electrons have a sharp, high peak of probability at around 0.5 angstroms then return to near-0 probability by 2.5 angstroms from the nucleus.  1s electrons are much closer to the nucleus — they screen the valence electrons. The 2s electrons have a very small peak at 0.5 angstroms, returning to 0 probability by 1 angstrom; 2s electrons experience greater nuclear attraction than the 2p electrons.  The curve then reaches a broad, medium-height probability at around 2.5 angstroms, before gradually decreasing to near-0 by 7 angstroms. The 2p electrons have a broad, medium-height probability roughly approximating the second portion of the 2s curve, except they peak at around 2 angstroms before gradually decreasing to near-0, again by 7 angstroms.

How would you modify Slater’s rules to adjust for the difference in electronic penetration of the nucleus for the 2s and 2p orbitals?