Problem: Imagine that a molecule with six electron groups is confined to two dimensions and therefore has a hexagonal planar electron geometry. If two of the six groups are lone pairs, where are they located?

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We are asked to give the most probable locations of the 2 lone pairs present in a theoretical molecule that exists in a plane.



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Problem Details

Imagine that a molecule with six electron groups is confined to two dimensions and therefore has a hexagonal planar electron geometry. If two of the six groups are lone pairs, where are they located?

The figure shows 3 lines crossed in 1 point at the same angles. The ends of the lines can be counted clockwise and are labeled with numbers. They are 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, and 2, respectively.


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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Molecular vs Electron Geometry concept. You can view video lessons to learn Molecular vs Electron Geometry. Or if you need more Molecular vs Electron Geometry practice, you can also practice Molecular vs Electron Geometry practice problems.

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