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Problem: In the Chemistry and the Environment box on free radicals in Chapter 9 in the textbook, we discussed the importance of the hydroxyl radical in reacting with and eliminating many atmospheric pollutants. However, the hydroxyl radical does not clean up everything. For example, chlorofluorocarbons-which destroy stratospheric ozone-are not attacked by the hydroxyl radical. Consider the hypothetical reaction by which the hydroxyl radical might react with a chlorofluorocarbon: OH(g) + CF2Cl2(g) → HOF(g) + CFCl2 (g). Use bond energies to explain why this reaction is improbable.

FREE Expert Solution

To calculate the ΔH°rxn using bond energies, we’re going to use the following equation:

Let’s first figure out what kind of bonds and how many moles are present in each reactants and products because the given bond energies are per mole.

Balanced Reaction: OH(g) + CF2Cl2(g) → HOF(g) + CFCl2 (g)

*always make sure that the given reaction is balanced

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Problem Details

In the Chemistry and the Environment box on free radicals in Chapter 9 in the textbook, we discussed the importance of the hydroxyl radical in reacting with and eliminating many atmospheric pollutants. However, the hydroxyl radical does not clean up everything. For example, chlorofluorocarbons-which destroy stratospheric ozone-are not attacked by the hydroxyl radical. Consider the hypothetical reaction by which the hydroxyl radical might react with a chlorofluorocarbon: OH(g) + CF2Cl2(g) → HOF(g) + CFCl2 (g). Use bond energies to explain why this reaction is improbable.

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Bond Energy concept. If you need more Bond Energy practice, you can also practice Bond Energy practice problems.

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Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor French's class at DEPAUL.