Ch.14 - Chemical EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Glauber’s salt, Na 2SO4·10H2O, was used by J. R. Glauber in the 17 th century as a medicinal agent. At 25°C, Kp = 4.08×10−25 for the loss of waters of hydration from Glauber’s salt:             Na 2SO4·10H2O(s) ⥫⥬ Na2SO4(s) + 10H2O(g)(b) How do the following changes affect the ratio (higher, lower, same) of hydrated form to anhydrous form for the system above?(1) Add more Na 2SO4(s)(2) Reduce the container volume(3) Add more water vapor(4) Add N2 gas

Problem

Glauber’s salt, Na 2SO4·10H2O, was used by J. R. Glauber in the 17 th century as a medicinal agent. At 25°C, Kp = 4.08×10−25 for the loss of waters of hydration from Glauber’s salt:
             Na 2SO4·10H2O(s) ⥫⥬ Na2SO4(s) + 10H2O(g)

(b) How do the following changes affect the ratio (higher, lower, same) of hydrated form to anhydrous form for the system above?
(1) Add more Na 2SO4(s)
(2) Reduce the container volume
(3) Add more water vapor
(4) Add N2 gas