Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: When a person exercises, muscle contractions produce lactic acid. Moderate increases in lactic acid can be handled by the blood buffers without decreasing the pH of blood. However, excessive amounts of lactic acid can overload the blood buffer system, resulting in a lowering of the blood pH. A condition called acidosis is diagnosed if the blood pH falls to 7.35 or lower. Assume the primary blood buffer system is the carbonate buffer system described in Exercise 45. Calculate what happens to the [H2CO3] / [HCO3-] ratio in blood when the pH decreases from 7.40 to 7.35.

Problem

When a person exercises, muscle contractions produce lactic acid. Moderate increases in lactic acid can be handled by the blood buffers without decreasing the pH of blood. However, excessive amounts of lactic acid can overload the blood buffer system, resulting in a lowering of the blood pH. A condition called acidosis is diagnosed if the blood pH falls to 7.35 or lower. Assume the primary blood buffer system is the carbonate buffer system described in Exercise 45. Calculate what happens to the [H2CO3] / [HCO3-] ratio in blood when the pH decreases from 7.40 to 7.35.