Ch.14 - Chemical EquilibriumWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Methanol, a common laboratory solvent, poses a threat of blindness or death if consumed in sufficient amounts. Once in the body, the substance is oxidized to produce formaldehyde (embalming fluid) and

Problem

Methanol, a common laboratory solvent, poses a threat of blindness or death if consumed in sufficient amounts. Once in the body, the substance is oxidized to produce formaldehyde (embalming fluid) and eventually formic acid. Both of these substances are also toxic in varying levels. The equilibrium between methanol and formaldehyde can be described as follows:

CH3OH(aq) ⇌ H2CO(aq) + H2(aq)

Assuming the value of K for this reaction is 3.7 x 10 -10, what are the equilibrium concentrations of each species if you start with a 1.24 M solution of methanol? What will happen to the concentration of methanol as the formaldehyde is further converted to formic acid?