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Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
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Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: A rigid vessel containing a 3:1 mol ratio of carbon dioxide and water vapor is held at 210˚C  where it has a total pressure of 2.10 atm. If the vessel is cooled to 10˚C so that all of the water vapor

Solution: A rigid vessel containing a 3:1 mol ratio of carbon dioxide and water vapor is held at 210˚C  where it has a total pressure of 2.10 atm. If the vessel is cooled to 10˚C so that all of the water vapor

Problem

A rigid vessel containing a 3:1 mol ratio of carbon dioxide and water vapor is held at 210˚C  where it has a total pressure of 2.10 atm. If the vessel is cooled to 10˚C so that all of the water vapor condenses, what is the pressure of carbon dioxide? Neglect the volume of the liquid water that forms on cooling.

Solution

This is a case where we have to find the pressure of a gas after temperature has been decreased. We will use the ideal gas law to solve this problem. First, let’s analyze what data we have.


Total pressure of the gas mixture 2.10 atm. We will use the 3:1 mole ratio of CO2:H2O to find the partial pressure of CO2, this will be our P1.

T1 = 210 oC

T2 = 10 oC

P2 = ? atm


Since all of the water vapors condense into liquid when the temperature is dropped, we won’t be using any data for water for the calculation of P2. Additionally, the question asks that we ignore the volume of liquid water that forms upon cooling.


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