All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: Hydrogen has two naturally occurring isotopes, 1H and 2H. Chlorine also has two naturally occurring isotopes, 35Cl and 37Cl. Thus, hydrogen chloride gas consists of four distinct types of molecules: 1

Solution: Hydrogen has two naturally occurring isotopes, 1H and 2H. Chlorine also has two naturally occurring isotopes, 35Cl and 37Cl. Thus, hydrogen chloride gas consists of four distinct types of molecules: 1

Problem

Hydrogen has two naturally occurring isotopes, 1H and 2H. Chlorine also has two naturally occurring isotopes, 35Cl and 37Cl. Thus, hydrogen chloride gas consists of four distinct types of molecules: 1H35Cl, 1H37Cl, 2H35Cl, and 2H37Cl. Place these four molecules in order of decreasing rate of effusion.

Solution

We can estimate the effusion of these gases by analyzing their molecular mass.

By getting the sum of atomic masses (superscript) of each atom in the molecules, we can get a molecular mass

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