Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous ReactionsWorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Solution: You choose to investigate some of the solubility guidelines for two ions not listed in the table below, the chromate ion (CrO42 -  and the oxalate ion (C2O42-).You are given 0.01 M solutions (A, B, C,

Solution: You choose to investigate some of the solubility guidelines for two ions not listed in the table below, the chromate ion (CrO42 -  and the oxalate ion (C2O42-).You are given 0.01 M solutions (A, B, C,

Problem
You choose to investigate some of the solubility guidelines for two ions not listed in the table below, the chromate ion (CrO42 -  and the oxalate ion (C2O42-).

Table 4.1 gives solubility guidelines for common ionic compounds in water and lists any important exceptions.

You are given 0.01 M solutions (A, B, C, D) of four water-soluble salts:


SolutionSoluteColor of Solution
ANa2CrO4Yellow
B(NH4)2C2O4Colorless
CAgNO3Colorless
DCaCl2Colorless


When these solutions are mixed, the following observations are made:


Experiment NumberSolutions MixedResult
1A+BNo precipitate, yellow solution
2A+CRed precipitate forms
3A+DYellow precipitate forms
4B+CWhite precipitate forms
5B+DWhite precipitate forms
6C+DWhite precipitate forms


Write a net ionic equation for the reaction that occurs in each of the experiments. Identify the precipitate formed, if any, in each of the experiments.

Identify the precipitate formed, if any, in the experiment 5.

Solution

Certain positive ions combine with negative ions to form either a liquid, aqueous, solid or gaseous compound. The Solubility Rules help us determine which form is created. 


Experiment 5 reacts solutions B: (NH4)2C2O4 and D: CaCl2 to form a white precipitate.

The reaction of (NH4)2C2O4 and CaCl2 is a double displacement reaction:


 


The product is a white precipitate. 


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