Ch.6 - Thermochemistry WorksheetSee all chapters
All Chapters
Ch.1 - Intro to General Chemistry
Ch.2 - Atoms & Elements
Ch.3 - Chemical Reactions
BONUS: Lab Techniques and Procedures
BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions
Ch.4 - Chemical Quantities & Aqueous Reactions
Ch.5 - Gases
Ch.6 - Thermochemistry
Ch.7 - Quantum Mechanics
Ch.8 - Periodic Properties of the Elements
Ch.9 - Bonding & Molecular Structure
Ch.10 - Molecular Shapes & Valence Bond Theory
Ch.11 - Liquids, Solids & Intermolecular Forces
Ch.12 - Solutions
Ch.13 - Chemical Kinetics
Ch.14 - Chemical Equilibrium
Ch.15 - Acid and Base Equilibrium
Ch.16 - Aqueous Equilibrium
Ch. 17 - Chemical Thermodynamics
Ch.18 - Electrochemistry
Ch.19 - Nuclear Chemistry
Ch.20 - Organic Chemistry
Ch.22 - Chemistry of the Nonmetals
Ch.23 - Transition Metals and Coordination Compounds

Endothermic & Exothermic Reactions

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Sections
Internal Energy
Calorimetry
Thermochemical Equation
Hess's Law
Enthalpy of Formation
End of Chapter 6 Problems
Additional Practice
Units of Energy
Endothermic & Exothermic Reactions
Additional Guides
Enthalpy

Solution: The methane molecule, CH4, has the geometry shown in following figure. Imagine a hypothetical process in which the methane molecule is "expanded," by simultaneously extending all four C–H bonds to inf

Problem
The methane molecule, CH4, has the geometry shown in following figure. Imagine a hypothetical process in which the methane molecule is "expanded," by simultaneously extending all four C–H bonds to infinity. We then have the process CH4(g) → C(g) + 4 H(g).

The figure shows a ball-and-stick model and a perspective drawing of CH4.

Compare this process with the reverse of the reaction that represents the standard enthalpy of formation of CH4(g). Calculate the enthalpy change in each case. What accounts for the difference in ΔH values?