Problem: The mechanisms of DNA synthesis differs between the two new dughter strands during replication. This is due to the fact that A. one RNA primer attaches to the 5' end of the parent strand and the other primer to the 3' end.B. both daughter strands can't extend toward the replication fork because there would not be room for two DNA polymerase enzymes.C. both RNA primers attach to the 3' end of the template strands, which are at opposite ends from each other.D. the DNA strands run antiparallel to each other and the DNA polymerase can only add nucleotides to the 3' end of the growing strand.

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Musolf's class at BROOKLYN CUNY.

FREE Expert Solution

DNA replication happens in both strands of a double-stranded DNA. During replication the DNA polymerase synthesizes the daughter polynucleotide strand in the 5' to 3' direction using primers as starting points.

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Problem Details

The mechanisms of DNA synthesis differs between the two new dughter strands during replication. This is due to the fact that 

A. one RNA primer attaches to the 5' end of the parent strand and the other primer to the 3' end.

B. both daughter strands can't extend toward the replication fork because there would not be room for two DNA polymerase enzymes.

C. both RNA primers attach to the 3' end of the template strands, which are at opposite ends from each other.

D. the DNA strands run antiparallel to each other and the DNA polymerase can only add nucleotides to the 3' end of the growing strand.

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the DNA Replication concept. You can view video lessons to learn DNA Replication. Or if you need more DNA Replication practice, you can also practice DNA Replication practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Musolf's class at BROOKLYN CUNY.