Problem: After a protein called XrB binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, a signal transduction pathway leads to inhibition of the cell cycle. A mutant cell line is discovered in which one of the relay proteins in the signal transduction pathway isabsent. What would be the outcome for the mutant cells?A. the cell never dividesB. the cells only divide when XrB is presentC. the cells only divide when XrB is absentD. the cells divide whether XrB is present or absent

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FREE Expert Solution

Signal transduction pathways basically receive a stimulus from a source, which can be external or internal, and pass the message in a series of activation/deactivation reactions that will eventually illicit a cellular response. From the given statement, it can be deduced that XrB gives the signal to inhibit (i.e. significantly reduce the rate) cell division. Basically, XrB is the stimulus, while cell cycle inhibition is the response.

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Problem Details

After a protein called XrB binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, a signal transduction pathway leads to inhibition of the cell cycle. A mutant cell line is discovered in which one of the relay proteins in the signal transduction pathway isabsent. What would be the outcome for the mutant cells?

A. the cell never divides

B. the cells only divide when XrB is present

C. the cells only divide when XrB is absent

D. the cells divide whether XrB is present or absent

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What scientific concept do you need to know in order to solve this problem?

Our tutors have indicated that to solve this problem you will need to apply the Cell Cycle Regulation concept. You can view video lessons to learn Cell Cycle Regulation. Or if you need more Cell Cycle Regulation practice, you can also practice Cell Cycle Regulation practice problems.

What professor is this problem relevant for?

Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Hogan's class at UNC.