Problem: Describe an example (real or hypothetical) that illustrates allopatric speciation. How does gene flow between populations affect the chances of speciation? Explain why sympatric speciation is less likely to occur than allopatric speciation.

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Allopatric speciation is when two population of the same species are geographically isolated from one another and these different population adapt to their own environments, mutates and evolves up to the point where the population can no longer interbreed, making them two different species. One example is the case of the Mexican and Northern spotted owl. The two species were studied to be once part of a single spotted owl species, but one population were believed to have underwent dispersal, moving to the south (Mexico), thus, the two population were not able to interbreed because of the distance and the adaptations they have endured, making them two different species of spotted owl. 

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Describe an example (real or hypothetical) that illustrates allopatric speciation. How does gene flow between populations affect the chances of speciation? 


Explain why sympatric speciation is less likely to occur than allopatric speciation.