Problem: Tastes and smells are distinct kinds of environmental information where ________. a. neural projections from taste receptors reach different parts of the brain than the neural projections from olfactory receptors b. the single area of the cerebral cortex that receives smell and taste signals can distinguish tastes and smells by the pattern of action potentials received c. tastant molecules are airborne, whereas odorant molecules are dissolved in fluids d. distinguishing tastant molecules requires learning, whereas smell discrimination is an innate process

🤓 Based on our data, we think this question is relevant for Professor Jaffe's class at UTSA.

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Problem Details

Tastes and smells are distinct kinds of environmental information where ________.

a. neural projections from taste receptors reach different parts of the brain than the neural projections from olfactory receptors

b. the single area of the cerebral cortex that receives smell and taste signals can distinguish tastes and smells by the pattern of action potentials received

c. tastant molecules are airborne, whereas odorant molecules are dissolved in fluids

d. distinguishing tastant molecules requires learning, whereas smell discrimination is an innate process

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Based on our data, we think this problem is relevant for Professor Jaffe's class at UTSA.